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Nootropics: What are they?

Nootropics are herbal supplements that help to boost cognitive function and brain health. Stride Nutrition’s Nootropic blend contains:

  • Bacopa: 300mg
  • Rhodiola: 200mg
  • Ginkgo biloba: 200mg

What is it for?

The term “nootropic” emerged in the early 70s to refer to a group of herbs and fabricated drugs that have been shown to activate high integrative brain mechanisms that help to promote awareness and functionality (17).

According to one of the first studies carried out on nootropics, “The main features of the nootropic profile consist of (a) enhancement of learning acquisition, (b) resistance to impairing agents, (c) facilitation of interhemispheric transfer of information, (d) enhanced resistance to brain "aggressions," (e) increased tonic cortico-subcortical "control," and (f) absence of usual pharmacological effects of neuropsychotropic drugs.” (18)

Nootropic blends are taken to help boost brain health, memory, anxiety, and general cognition. Each of the herbs above have been shown to have a direct impact on brain health.

Bacopa is an adaptogenic herb that helps to reduce anxiety and memory (1, 2, 3). Rhodiola is taken by itself to decrease fatigue, stress, and even to prevent post-exercise muscle damage (5, 6, 9). Ginkgo is taken to prevent cognitive decline (11, 12).

Together, these nootropic herbs help to combat the negative results of a lack of brain health.

Research-Based Benefits

Below we have summarized some of the research-backed benefits for your brain of each of the nootropic herbs included in Stride Nutrition’s brain health blend.

Bacopa

  • Helps to boost memory and reduce forgetfulness (1, 2, 3)
  • May help increase attention (4)
  • Prevents rises in anxiety (1, 3)
  • Small, but significant improvements in depressive symptoms (1)

Rhodiola

  • Decreases fatigue and increases related cognition (5, 6)
  • Improves subjective wellbeing (7)
  • Reduction in depressive symptoms (8)
  • Reduces muscle damage following exercise (9)
  • May help reduce stress (6, 10)

Ginkgo Biloba

  • Prevents cognitive decline (11, 12)
  • Reduces symptoms of intermitted claudication (13, 14)
  • Reduces symptoms of acute mountain sickness (15)

 

Recommended for:*

The scientific literature suggests that the following people are most likely to benefit from taking nootropics:

  • People who want to improve their memory or cognitive function
  • People who want to reduce fatigue
  • People who are under a lot of stress
  • People who exercise regularly
  • Those who are at risk of cognitive decline
  • Elderly and aging people

*These are general recommendations and do not replace medical prescriptions or recommendations.

 

Research Summary:

Outcome

Findings

Dose

Study Reference

Improved speed of visual information processing.

These findings suggest that B. monniera may improve higher order cognitive processes that are critically dependent on the input of information from our environment such as learning and memory.

300mg Bacopa.

(3)

Enhanced cognitive performance with aging.

Controlling for baseline cognitive deficit using the Blessed Orientation-Memory-Concentration test, Bacopa participants had enhanced AVLT (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test) delayed word recall memory scores relative to placebo.

300mg Bacopa per day

(4)

Improved “Working Memory”

The Bacopa monniera product significantly improved performance on the 'Working Memory' factor, more specifically spatial working memory accuracy.

2 x 150 mg KeenMind over time

(2)

Improvements in learning and memory.

B. monniera may improve higher order cognitive processes that are critically dependent on the input of information from our environment such as learning and memory.

300mg daily

(3)

Reduction in general fatigue

The perceptive and cognitive cerebral functions mentioned above were investigated using 5 different tests. A statistically significant improvement in these tests was observed in the treatment group (RRE) during the first two weeks period. No side-effects were reported for either treatment noted.

Not specified

(5)

Reduced stress levels, disability, functional impairment

All tests showed clinically relevant improvements with regard to stress symptoms, disability, functional impairment and overall therapeutic effect. Improvements were observed even after 3 days of treatment, as were continuing improvements after 1 and 4 weeks.

200mg Rhodiola twice daily for 4 weeks

(6)

Reduced fatigue

The study showed a pronounced antifatigue effect reflected in an antifatigue index defined as a ratio called AFI.

Rhodiola, not specified.

(7)

Reduction in lactate levels

Chronic Rhodiola Rosea supplementation is able to reduce both lactate levels and parameters of skeletal muscle damage after an exhaustive exercise session. Moreover this supplementation seems to ameliorate fatty acid consumption.

Not specified, over 4 weeks.

(9)

Improved cognitive functioning

EGb 761® improved cognitive functioning, neuropsychiatric symptoms and functional abilities in both types of dementia.

240mg ginkgo once daily for 24 weeks

(16)

Claudication distance was significantly increased by Ginkgo

Analogue Scale estimation scores were significantly improved after 24 weeks in patients receiving EgB, but not placebo

Not specified

(13)

Decrease in incidence of acute mountain sickness

This is the first study to demonstrate that 1 day of pretreatment with ginkgo 60 mg TID may significantly reduce the severity of AMS prior to rapid ascent from sea level to 4205 m.

60mg 1 day prior to ascent

(15)

 

 

 

 

 

References:

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18611150
  2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18683852
  3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11498727
  4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18611150
  5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11081987
  6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22228617
  7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12725561
  8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17990195
  9. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20308973
  10. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19170145
  11. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086747
  12. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19347685
  13. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2254678
  14. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9612115
  15. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12006162
  16. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22086747
  17. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ddr.430020505
  18. http://psycnet.apa.org/record/1978-31272-001